Physicians

Oncimmune’s proprietary EarlyCDT® cancer detection tests are based on the presence in the blood of autoantibodies against specific tumour associated antigens that have the potential to detect cancer up to four years earlier than other methods and can be applied to a very wide range of solid tumour types.

A key ingredient to Oncimmune’s success is its extensive scientific and clinical validation studies. More than 120,000 patient samples were run and 12 million data points analysed to validate the technical and clinical performance of EarlyCDT–Lung. Since then over 150,000 commercial tests have also been run in the US laboratory.

EarlyCDT®–Lung is being used in what is generally acknowledged to be the largest randomised trial for the early detection of lung cancer using biomarkers ever conducted; the National Health Service (NHS) Scotland ECLS study of 12,000 high-risk smokers.1

1 Sullivan FM, Farmer E, Mair FS et al. Detection in blood of autoantibodies to tumour antigens as a case-finding method in lung cancer using the EarlyCDT®-Lung Test (ECLS): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. BMC Cancer 2017;17:187. http://rdcu.be/pZ60

Pulmonary Nodule Risk Assessment

A key ingredient to Oncimmune’s success is its extensive scientific and clinical validation studies. More than 120,000 patient samples were run and 12 million data points analysed to validate the technical and clinical performance of EarlyCDT–Lung. Since then over 150,000 commercial tests have also been run in the US laboratory.

There is a widely acknowledged clinical need for new tools to assess malignancy in indeterminate pulmonary nodules (IPNs)1,2 which are radiographic opacities in the lung that carry some risk of cancer.3

Each year nearly 1.6 million Americans have an incidentally detected nodule on the lung due to the increase in computed tomography (CT) scanning.

Lung Cancer Screening

EarlyCDT—Lung can be used to detect lung cancer early, in high-risk patients. An ongoing NHS clinical trial has demonstrated a stage shift of 55% to early-stage disease.

Most lung cancers are diagnosed once they are at a late stage1
· Lung cancer tends to be diagnosed when symptoms become apparent; by this time the tumour is often at an advanced stage (III or IV).

· Over 50% of all patients die within 12 months of diagnosis.

· Early diagnosis more than triples the 5-year survival rate to 56% if the tumour is found to be localised, but unfortunately, only 16% of lung cancer are diagnosed while still localised.

1 Noone AM, Howlader N, Krapcho M, Miller D, Brest A, Yu M, Ruhl J, Tatalovich Z, Mariotto A, Lewis DR, Chen HS, Feuer EJ, Cronin KA (eds). SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2015, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD, https://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2015/, based on November 2017 SEER data submission, posted to the SEER web site, April 2018.